Behind-The-Scenes: Little Princess

As part of my 1 hour Styled Session of my 5-year old’s birthday, Ava changed into her flowy pink dress and wore a handmade glittery gold crown that I ordered from etsy.  (She wanted a Princess theme whereas I wanted The Train Station theme, so we compromised by doing both.  Actually, she had 3 outfits, but that’s another post!)  :)

The fog had rolled in, so the temperature dropped 10 degrees and the wind picked up.  I knew this leg of the shoot needed to be really quick.  It was a time to just “get the shot and go”!  We were there for about 15 minutes, including walking to/from the parking lot.

My oldest daughter held my reflector when I needed it, and she took a couple behind-the-scenes shots with my phone as you can see here.  Thanks, Mia!

Behind-the-Scenes

Ava’s dress had a gauzy layer that kept getting caught on the prickly wild flowers, so I had her stand on a stool.

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I had waited til the end of the day to get the “golden hour” light, but didn’t anticipate the fog that rolled in after we started.  With the dense fog, you can see that we were running out of light quick!

My poor girl was so cold that she used her arms to hug herself to keep warm — which actually looked pretty darn cute, so I shot through it.

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What I Shot:

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Conclusion:

You can’t always control every aspect of your shoot, like the weather.  So find ways to make the most of what you have.  Sometimes that means finding an alternate light source.  Sometimes it means shooting through the cold and having artistic “thoughtful” shots of your subject rather than “happy” ones.

Use the resources you have, think quickly, and have fun!

The Secret About BxW

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I love BxW images so much that I asked our photographer to shoot Lawrence and my engagement portraits entirely in BxW film.  This was a long time ago, but I remember it vividly.  The photographer responded politely:  “Usually when people come to Hawaii, they want their photos to be in color, so they can see the beauty of the island.”

Hmmmm…he has a point, I thought.  “Alright, take a couple shots in color and the rest in BxW please.”   :D

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What does this have to do with my lesson on BxW?  Not much, but it was a funny story.  All true, by the way.

Alright, let’s get to it…. Secret #1:  NOT ALL IMAGES LOOK GOOD IN BxW!

Shocking, right?!!  The problem is, not everyone realizes this bec they are learning with a digital camera.

With digital photography, it becomes easy to adopt the philosophy of shoot-NOW-think-LATER, because it uses technology where you can view your images a second after pressing the shutter and many rely on post-processing to fix something or change a photo to BxW.  All with a few clicks of a button.

This process leaves little reason to need to think very much before you shoot.

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Secret #2:  SHOOT INTENTIONALLY FOR BxW

When I shot entirely with a film camera, one of the things I learned very quickly was looking out for imagery based on what kind of film was loaded in my camera.  I’d shoot differently with BxW film versus Color film.

If I had a roll of 100 speed color, then I’d bring my camera somewhere sunny and colorful, like a beach boardwalk.  (FYI:  The speed of a roll of film is like a digital camera’s ISO.)  If I had a roll of 800 speed BxW, then I’d look for a shady area or shoot at night… and I’d look for interesting textures, patterns and variations of light.

With BxW images, I think about how light and dark would shape the image.

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If you still think “BxW rocks and everything looks great as BxW”, then let me give you an example of why that’s not true…

* REAL LIFE EXAMPLE *

A few months ago, I took Lawrence’s relaxed, lifestyle-esque headshots in color to be used for color.  So I chose a location that had cool indoor lights for a colorful backdrop and a small window for natural light on his face.  Recently, he needed a BxW headshot for something else.  For the sake of time, I took the existing photos and converted them to BxW.

The Problems:

1. There were too many colors with the same tonality, so when I converted this color image to BxW, my subject no longer stood out as he did in color.

2. Some of the colors blended into each other, like his shoulders and hair.  EEK.

3. In BxW, the lines in the background became irritably distracting.  One line even cut through his head — Oy!

This photo did NOT translate well into BxW.

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The Solution:

We did another shoot — but this time, it was intended for BxW images.  (I shot as if I had a roll of BxW film in my camera.)

To prepare, I had to pick a good location.  I knew my subject has dark hair and would be wearing a black suit (because I picked his outfit!), so I chose a location that would provide contrast to my subject.  In other words, no dark backgrounds!

First stop was a garden for a textured backdrop.

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Now there is definition between my subject and his background!

Below is another image taken at the same place.  I angled the camera slightly downward to give less emphasis to his jaw.  (I also made him laugh, so this image is my favorite.)

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Before leaving this location, I found a giant cream-colored door.  Voila, the “clean” light backdrop!

The thin lines, in this shot, provide context to my subject without being distracting and makes the headshot feel more lifestyle than studio.  The fact that the door was cream translated to a light grey, which works perfectly because a white-white would be too stark.

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Nearby, there was a garage.  I like the industrial feel of the cement and hard lines of the building.  So now I have a texturally interesting background for BxW!

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TAKE-AWAYS:

~ Not all color photos should be changed into BxW; and not all BxW photos should be color.  Some images look best only one way.

~ There are different things to look out for when you are shooting in color versus BxW.

~ With BxW portraits, you need a background that will be contrasting to the person.  (Sometimes you can’t control this, like if it’s a Lifestyle session with children, but it’s something to look out for.)

~ You also have to consider tonality of colors (e.g., medium shades of red and green may look great together in color, but when changed to BxW, they will both look like a medium grey).  Things with similar tonality will blend together in BxW.

~ Especially with BxW images, you can use light and shadows to shape or define your subject.

QUESTION OF THE DAY:

Is my husband lucky to have a photographer for a wife, so he can get free photoshoots — OR — is he UNlucky because it also means I get to blog about him?!!  :)

HOMEWORK:

If you have a DSLR, change your setting to “BxW”.  (Most cameras will have that option.)  Then go out there and shoot with intent to create a good BxW image.  You will end up training your eyes to notice the background, tones, etc.

If you have access to a film camera, even better.  So leap in the air and cheer “HOORAY”!  heh heh.  Afterwards, shoot two rolls of film, one in color and one in BxW.  Use both rolls in the same location and same time of day, so that most factors are equal.  Shooting with film, even for just one day, will improve your photography skills.  I guarantee it.

Photography Projects for Kids

I love kids.  I just love ‘em!  A child’s laughter is THE best sound ever.  (Ocean waves come in #2.)  I love how kids are real with you, which makes “I hate (fill in the blank)” sting a little and “You are my best friend in the universe” mean so much.  I love running around with them, playing games, and making jokes.  My husband rolls his eyes when I show my kids “see-food” during meals, but it makes them laugh so hard!  I just tell them they can only do that with mom and that other people may think it’s impolite.  Fingers crossed that they’ll remember it.

So I probably don’t need to say this, but…  I love photographing kids and families because it combines two things I love so much:  kids and photography.

I also think it’s important that kids exercise their creativity, so I always encourage my kids to draw, paint, build, tell stories, write books, and now, experiment with photography.  My two youngest (they are 4 and 7) have children’s camera.  They’re more like a toy, but they practice composition and put thought into what they want to photograph.  My oldest (she is 9) has a digital camera, and she takes a lot of artistic photos with it.  We also have an instant camera (one that prints each image onto a small 2×3″ print) and we bring it on trips, so the kids can stick it into their journals.

The point is, kids can learn photography at an early age.  This doesn’t mean you should give them an expensive DSLR and pray they don’t break/lose/throw/sit on/drop it.  There are activities you can do together that can help them appreciate photography as an Art and a storytelling tool.

Here’s an example…

This past weekend, I had a “mommy date” with my son, Ian, who is 7 years old.  We bought…er, I mean, adopted a monster, named Domo, who looks like a furry chocolate bar.  My kids love him, as do I, admittedly.  (He’s especially cute in a mini Cal shirt!)

During our date, Ian and I got yummy drinks and then took Domo on a photoshoot.  Ian calls it a “Domo-shoot”!  Ian directed Domo and I pressed the shutter.  We laughed and laughed at all the things Domo could do.  (He apparently isn’t great at jumping, but he is super adventurous with tree-climbing and hiking up a hill.)  We had such a great time.

What kind of photography-related activities do you do with your kids?

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“Um, how do I get down?”

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*sniiiffff*  “Ahhhh, that’s nice.  WAAA-CHOOOOOOO!”

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“I need to work on my tan.”

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“Owww.”

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“Hike, 1, 2, 3…”

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“Weeeee, this is fun!”

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Photographing Images With More Pizzazz

DPS just published my latest article, and I am excited to share it with you!

I’ve been doing this lesson for decades.  Yes, THAT long!  :)  It has helped me see plain, everyday things differently.  Does this translate to my Lifestyle Photography?  Yes, indeed.  And now I’m sharing my secret lesson with you!

[NOTE:  You do not have to be a Professional Photographer to gain from this 10-minute lesson.  I was doing this well before starting my own business.  You can be at any level, be any age and have any type of equipment.]

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Improve Your Portrait Photography in 5 Minutes

Here is a short article with tips to consider the next time you are photographing people…

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How To Photograph Shy Adults

Here is an article I wrote for some of my readers who read How To Photograph Shy Children and asked for tips on photographing adults!  See?!!  I listen!  :)

This article was published on DPS barely a day ago, so I am happy there are 4900+ shares already.  I love when my tips can help others.

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Food Photography Tips

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Does this photo make you want to eat it?

Food Photographers think this way.

Food Photography can be simple to quite complicated where there are Stylists involved to glaze and spray and even use tweezers to carefully place each crumb!

I admit I can never be a Food Stylist because I find the natural crumbs and even sauce splatters appetizingly beautiful.  I also can’t be a full-time Food Photographer because I don’t have the self-control to walk away without tasting it!  (I love Food, what can I say?!!)

Here are a few basic tips to get you started with Food Photography…

 

BASIC FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS:

1.  Watch your angles.

Take a top view then a side view.  Variety is the spice of life.  (Spice, get it?)

2.  Minimize what’s in the frame.

You don’t have to get too fancy with what is under, behind and next to the food item.  Let the food be the star.

3.  Use natural light.

Food looks better in natural light, so take the shot during the day and set the food near a window.  Make sure you turn off the indoor lights, so there isn’t mixed lighting on the food.

4.  Prepare it to be eaten. 

When you are photographing food, it can help to prepare the food like you are ABOUT to eat it.  Sometimes seeing a piece on a fork or a heaping spoonful makes the food look more scrumptious!

5.  Consider the ingredients.

 

Example:

I recently baked banana blueberry bread.  Instead of photographing it as a fully baked loaf, I sliced it to cool (photographed it) and then plated it (and photographed it again).  I also photographed some of the ingredients, like the locally grown blueberries right after I washed them and the two perfect organic brown eggs.  The dough mixture even looked good to me because it had chunks of fruit, so I photographed that too.

Do any of these images make you want to eat it?  I know MY answer!  Mmmmmmmm….

Preparation

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Cooling

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Ready for a Bite

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As a reward for reading this far (haha), here is my recipe.  It is seriously delicious!

Annie’s Blueberry-nana Bread

Ingredients:

Butter, for greasing the loaf pan
1 1/2 cups flour, plus extra for dusting the loaf pan
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 large eggs, beaten
2 tsp vanilla extract
3 ripe bananas, peeled and coarsely mashed to yield about 1 cup
1 cup of fresh blueberries

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.  Butter and flour a 9 x 5 x 3″ loaf pan.  Set aside.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients (flour, baking soda, salt, baking powder, cinnamon).  In a large bowl, beat the wet ingredients (sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla) until blended.  Add the dry ingredients and stir until blended.  Gently fold in the bananas and blueberries at the end.  Careful not to over-blend.

Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan.  Bake for 55 minutes (times may vary slightly depending on your oven).  You can check by using a toothpick and inserting it into the middle of the loaf.  If it comes out clean, then the loaf is done.  Set the pan aside to cool.  Then remove the loaf from the pan and cool completely on a wire rack, about 2 hours.

Enjoy with your favorite beverage!  And don’t forget to share.  :P

The Impact of Small Changes

In case you missed this quick tip on my Facebook page, here it is…

*QUIZ*

These 2 images were taken 2 seconds apart.

There is a HUGE difference between the two, yet I only made ONE TINY change.  What did I change from Image A to Image B? 

[Hint: It is the same location.]

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*PHOTOGRAPHY TIP*

When you want “good light” for Portrait Photography and the light currently isn’t ideal, you have a variety of options, such as use a reflector, change locations, and hold a diffuser above the subject — just to name a few.  However, you don’t always have those options available because of any number of reasons (ie, not enough time, your subject is fast-moving). 

So what can you do?  Consider that SMALL changes can offer BIG results as well! 

In this example, I used the same camera, lens and settings.  I didn’t introduce anything or take anything away.  Everything was the same, except…

I had my subject turn slightly where she was sitting.  That was it! 

Changing the angle of the light source to the subject changed the quality of light on her face.  Booyah!

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Hey!  If you don’t want to miss any photography tips, make sure you “like” my FB page!  When I think of a quick tip, I post them there.

Don’t forget to say hi when you’re there!  ~annie

How Your Subject Feels

*PHOTOGRAPHY TIP*

Portrait Photography is not only about having CAMERA skills, but also PEOPLE skills — specifically, knowing how to make her subjects feel comfortable during a session and guiding them into the most flattering light and positions.

Here is an example from the other day.  I had an Executive Headshot session, which is typically 30 to 40 minutes.

The first set of images below were images taken in the very beginning of the shoot.  They are nice portraits and, for some photographers, the session would have ended right there.

Instead, we kept going and after some talking (for fun, not about the shoot) and some guidance… the images went from “nice” to “LOVE!”

First Few Shots ==> Nice

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Shots Later On ==> Comfort ==> Gorgeousness

Taking aside the difference in the background and jacket, just look at her face.  Even her eyes are smiling!

You can’t instruct someone to “look relaxed” or “smile with your entire face”; they do that when they feel at ease with and trust the photographer.

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TAKEAWAY

How your subject feels during the shoot ends up being attributes a viewer perceives when they look at the photo.

Just look at the comparison below.

When you look at Image A and Image B, you may feel different things about their abilities, their competency and even their personalities.  And they are the same person!  That is the power of a headshot.

Who would you hire?  Who would you call?  Who would you prefer to work with? 

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FINAL NOTE

That doesn’t mean the last few shots are always the ‘money shots’.  Some photographers may choose not to take a single image until their subject is relaxed and ready.

For me, I go right in and start shooting because I think the longer people wait, the more anxiety or nervousness may build.  Then I talk to them and guide them throughout their session.

We all have different styles, but the goal is the same.

Understanding Exposure

An article I wrote for DPS last month was just published, and overall, it seems to be helping a lot of people who are ready to take their photography skills to a new level.  And THAT is exciting!!!

Once you have a basic understanding that Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO work together, you can control the look of your images!

This article was written for beginners, so if you’re an advanced photographer, keep flipping and I’ll chat with you later.  :)

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[Note:  The adorable fish drawing that illustrates Aperture was drawn by Mia, my super creative girl who was 8-year old at the time.  She also came up with the term "Moonglasses".]